Jury Selection by Caitlin Randall

As outlined in chapter 15, social psychology has no limits – especially not the courtroom. While one would expect everything within the hallowed halls of the legal kingdom to be precisely fair, that simply isn’t the case. We can make choices based on the influence of any of the individuals in the room, and essentially ignore everything we will be told by either side, blinded by any sort of variables. The chapter details how jury selection is particularly important, and most juries are formed with great consideration to any bias by potential jurors. The selection process can get very gritty, and any sort of individual predilection or prejudice can disqualify someone from serving on a jury. However, some people don’t like serving jury duty, and abuse these regulations in an attempt to get out of it – doing anything from faking strange behavior to developing sudden preferences that would inherently prefer either side, without regard to any testimony.

People like Liz Lemon, for instance:

In the above clip, Liz brings out the oddities to get off of jury duty so she can return to work. She acts like a huge Star Wars fan, talking about her planet and how she can’t serve because she’s “actually a hologram”. She was faking some sort of delusion to seem mentally unstable and therefore unfit for jury duty, as if her strange personality would have been unable to clearly decide on a verdict.

 

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  1. #1 by alylallatin on June 7, 2012 - 9:41 PM

    This episode is hilarious! I love this example of social psychology having no limits in the courtroom. I’ve seen this sort of behavior many times in my life, I’ve even had teachers who use similar tactics to get out of jury duty.

  2. #2 by tatiherman on June 8, 2012 - 12:00 AM

    I always wondered what the big deal was about jury duty- but then I would be excited about anything getting me out of going to my job. This clip is very funny and does a great job of displaying the lengths that someone will go to in order to get out of jury duty.

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