sbezz17

This user hasn't shared any biographical information

Hindsight Bias- Seren Bezzant

Hindsight Bias is the tendency people have to see past events as more predictable than they actually are after the fact. The idea of “I told you so” or “I knew that would happen.”

A more serious example of hindsight bias is my brother’s best friend committed suicide last year and at his funeral, my brother really felt this burden that the signs were right in front of him, but he didn’t do anything. He was feeling very guilty because he felt like he knew that the signs were so obvious now. This illustrates the hindsight bias because my brother thought only after the fact that his friend’s depression and comments were obviously suicidal. His guilt stemmed from hindsight bias. It was easy for him to think after the fact the signs were obvious, but in the moment they weren’t so obvious and telling.

Advertisements

3 Comments

College Graduates and Financial Security-Seren Bezzant

Social Comparison is defined as one’s evaluation of their own ideas and abilities by comparing themselves to others.

 

In yesterday’s Deseret Newspaper as article entitled “College Students’ financial fantasies meet reality.” This article explores the fear college grads are facing when they graduate. They fear they won’t be able to find a job and if they do, they won’t be able to find a good paying job. The following figure, which was published with the article, shows that college grads on average say they’ll need 81,600 dollars in order to feel secure, which is much higher than what an actual college graduate makes, which on average is 21,900 dollars. The article speculates that college graduates are comparing their lifestyles to their parents and are disregarding the work that goes into it.

 

This illustrates the social comparison theory because college graduates are overestimating how much money they’ll need to feel secure because they are comparing their lifestyles to their parents and other successful adults around them. By doing this they are underestimating the work it takes to get to such a comfortable financial position. By comparing themselves to their parents they are not able to assess their financial situation accurately.

1 Comment

Eyewitness’s testimony-Seren Bezzant

The book talks about the reliability of an eyewitness’s testimony. The books says that eyewitnesses who remember minor details often are looking at the face of the perpetrator. But no matter what, eyewitness testimony are very persuasive in the actual courtroom.

This is the trailer of an old Alfred Hitchcock movie. It’s called The Wrong Man. This is a true story about a man who was wrongly accused of robbing a bank. They say they have eyewitness’ testimonies and that those eyewitness have identified him.

In this clip you see the woman identifying the wrong man in the line up. In the book it also talks about minimizing false lineups and on way to do that is remind he identifier that the man that robbed the bank or whatever the crime is may not even be in the lineup. In the movie there are also a lot of leading questions from the detectives that could have led the witnesses to believe that the man in custody was the right man after all. This movie illustrates this phenomenon very nicely and shows the dangers that eyewitness testimonies can have. In the end of the movie another man gets caught robbing another store and confesses to both robberies, otherwise the wrong man would have stayed in jail. He was scheduled for trial and the book suggest that after these eyewitness testimonies, he wouldn’t have had much of a chance.

Leave a comment

Comparison Level for Alternatives- Seren Bezzant

Comparison level for alternatives falls under the Social Exchange Theory of Attraction. It is the idea that people are satisfied in their relationships based on their extent to which they perceive their ability to exchange their current relationship for a better one.

I had a friend in high school that was very unsatisfied with her boyfriends. She had one boyfriend that she didn’t really like, but kept dating him. One day we had a long conversation about it. She said the reason she kept dating this boy was because she didn’t think she could find anyone better at the time. She didn’t really like him she just didn’t have anyone better at the moment. However, she believed that she could get a better relationships and could drop him whenever she wanted.

This is an example of comparison level for alternatives because she based her satisfaction for her relationship/friendship on her perceived ability to find a better relationship. She eventually did find a “better” relationship and eventually dropped the guys she was dating. Now that she is married and she believes she can’t get a better guy, she feels much more satisfied and secure in her relationships.

Leave a comment

Comparison Level for Alternatives- Seren Bezzant

Comparison level for alternatives falls under the Social Exchange Theory of Attraction. It is the idea that people are satisfied in their relationships based on their extent to which they perceive their ability to exchange their current relationship for a better one.

I had a friend in high school that was very unsatisfied with her boyfriends. She had one boyfriend that she didn’t really like, but kept dating him. One day we had a long conversation about it. She said the reason she kept dating this boy was because she didn’t think she could find anyone better at the time. She didn’t really like him she just didn’t have anyone better at the moment. However, she believed that she could get a better relationships and could drop him whenever she wanted.

This is an example of comparison level for alternatives because she based her satisfaction for her relationship/friendship on her perceived ability to find a better relationship. She eventually did find a “better” relationship and eventually dropped the guys she was dating. Now that she is married and she believes she can’t get a better guy, she feels much more satisfied and secure in her relationships.

Leave a comment

Negative State-Relief Model- Seren Bezzant

The Negative State-Relief Model is a theory that says that we help people in order to relieve our own negative feelings.

For an example, I wanted to tell a story about my neighbor. She has been diagnosed with depression. She is very serviceable and helpful with anyone in need. She is always the first to respond when there is a neighborhood “crisis” or any damage done. She always brought food for people in the ward, who were sick,  just had a baby, etc. All in all, she is just very giving and thoughtful of others and their needs. However, she recently confided to my mom that the way she can relieve her depressive thoughts and feelings is through helping other people. It’s a way to channel her thoughts from herself to other people and it has been the most successful way to cope with it. This is not a bad thing, but it illustrates very clearly this theory. Because she serve and helps people to rid of already existing negative or bad feelings.

However, by the same token people who are in a good mood are said to be more willing to give. There are examples for both. It just depends on the situation.

Leave a comment

Influences on Aggression- Seren Bezzant

Aggression is defined as verbal or physical acts intended to hurt someone. The book identifies several influences on aggression such as extreme heat or any kind of climate change such as extreme odors.

So my family has had a few experiences with this. On a family vacation in South Carolina we were experience extreme heat and humidity that my family was not used to. My niece was about one or two years old and she kept telling her mom she was cold. Her mother, after may complaints about being cold, got very aggressive and said “You are not cold it’s a million degrees out here and you are sweating!” My niece just retorted “No, mom I cold” and that only made the situation worse. My sister-in-law is a very even tempered person but because of this extreme heat, she acted more aggressively than she normally would.

Another experience is with my nephew. He’s about six years old and he has a very sensitive nose. Any strong smelling lotion or soap really irritates him. He hates any kind of strong smell, good or bad. They are all stinky to him. So one day I was babysitting him and I had to go to work, so I was getting ready. My hands were really dry so I put on some lotion and that really set my nephew off. I had made him a sandwich and he wouldn’t eat it, because he could smell “my stinky smell” on it. It became very verbally aggressive with me and said a lot of mean things to me that he wouldn’t otherwise have said, if he wasn’t experience this climate change, the extreme odor.

 

Leave a comment